Quick and Easy Cat Bed

I’ve been wanting to make some cat beds and cat cocoons lately.  I found some nice soft yarn, Chunky Luxe Big by Loops and Threads.  It’s a jumbo (7) yarn.  I also bought a giant 25 mm crochet hook.  Here’s a pattern for a quick and easy cat bed using giant yarn and a giant hook.

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Materials:

Size 25.00 mm hook

2 skeins of Chunky Luxe Big! by Loops & Threads (Teal) (64 yards)

Pattern:

Start with a magic ring (mr)

Round 1:  6 sc in the mr

Round 2: 2 sc in each stitch from previous round (12 sc)

Round 3:  sc in first stitch, 2 sc in next stitch, continue around (18 sc)

Round 4:  sc in first two stitches, 2 sc in next stitch, continue around (24 sc)

Round 5: sc in first 3 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch, continue around (30 sc)

Remaining rounds: sc in each stitch around (30 sc) until out of yarn, tie off.

The cats seem to enjoy it already.

 

 

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Billy Butcherson

My next prop for Halloween is Billy Butcherson.

After Halloween last year I picked up some styrofoam body parts on clearance, a skull and a torso.

I started off the project by covering the styrofoam in a sealer. I picked one up at one of the craft stores, but don’t remember which one. They are usually in the same location as the styrofoam.

After sealing the styrofoam, I started to use my model clay to make a nose and lips for the skull. I’m not an artist, but I’m pretty happy with that nose.

Now comes lots of painting. The torso wasn’t so bad, the face had many, many layers of paint. Plus adding eye balls and eyelids (clay).

I finally smoothed our the face with some watered down paint and Hodge Podge. Oh and seeing the lips closed too! I purposefully had his lips protrude out some so I could see through them.

The final step after all the painting was to spray paint the torso and head with polyurethane to help water proof his paint.

I inserted some wooden skewers in the torso and attached the head. The wig is actually an Edward Scissorhands wig. I used a black drape for his coat. A spooky cloth for his ascot thing. And some zombie hand stakes for his hands. I also inserted a sturdy garden stake into the ground and pushed his torso on over top it to stake him into the ground.

I think I’m pretty proud of him.

Jonah’s Hands

Well, I’m sure everyone knows who he is by now, but I’m just enthralled by Jonah’s Hands.  I learned about Jonah in one of my Facebook crochet groups and I’ve been following him on Facebook ever since.  He’s been called a crochet prodigy, he taught himself to crochet at the age of 5 and at the age of 11 he is an internet sensation.  He even has his own company, Jonah’s Hands, LLC.

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In the Round

My first experience doing motifs with joins in the round was last summer when I made the Dancing Daisy Crochet-A-Long.  When I was at the Pittsburgh Creative Arts Festival I bought a crochet kit from Stunning String Studio.  The kit was the Floating Wrap pattern by Robyn Chachula, one of my favorite teachers at the festival.  It came with three skeins of Luxury in Storm Cloud by Stunning String Studio.  I ended up purchasing an extra skein because the pattern said that three would make a medium and four would be needed for a large.  I didn’t wan to run out of yarn at the end, so I just bought an extra to make sure I had enough.

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Fisherman Afghan

While my grandmother always made Granny Square afghans, my mom always gravitated to the Fisherman Afghans.  I also see them referred to as Aran afghans,  I’m not sure if they are the same thing or if there is a difference between the two, but they both look the same to me.  Aran afghans seem to be in the style of Aran sweaters from the Aran Islands.

Anyway, I’ve been seeing this style of afghan showing up in my crochet groups recently, my knitting group too.  This type of afghan seems to be gaining some popularity lately, so keep your eyes peeled if you like to keep up with the crafting trends.  I tried to do a little research and haven’t been able to find anything out about this style of afghan.  I can’t find it’s history or whether it is the same as the Aran afghan.  All I know about this style is that it has different types of stitches in long columns.  Popular stitches I’ve seen include popcorn stitch, cables, and lattice stitch.

My mom made this afghan by modifying off a pattern in the book Vanna’s Favorite Crochet Gifts.  She made a couple of them and gifted them to some friends.  She jotted her pattern down and when she shares it with my I’ll post it for anyone that may be interested.  

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